Passover Thoughts

Pesach (Passover) is quickly upon us. But why remember an event that happened 4500 years ago? Is it simply cultural, is it just a religious practice? Why, and why should believers in Yeshua (Jesus) observe this day as well? When instituting the celebration Adonai said this, “Remember this day in…

Continue reading

Parsha Thought – Shemini

There had been a seven day inauguration process that was set to reach its climax today. It was now the first of Nissan. For those past seven days, Aaron and his sons were taught and trained by Moshe in regards to the specifics of the different offerings that could be brought to the Mishkan. Up to this point, Moses had been the one doing the processes and procedures concerning the atonement offerings. It was now Aaron’s turn.

Continue reading

Parsha Thought – Vayikra

This week we begin a new book of the Torah, Vayikra. Vayikra, or “Leviticus” in English actually means “And He called”. Here Adoni calls Moshe to Himself to teach him the statutes regarding the temple sacrifices and offerings. As briefly touched on in last weeks Shabbat teaching, sacrifice or korban, in Hebrew, (קָרְבָּן) comes from the root word karav (קָרַב) meaning “to approach or to come near”. It’s important to note, however, that the very first thing given to Moshe is in regards to one who decides to give an “olah kerebano,” the ascending offering.

Continue reading

Rosh Chodesh – The Blessings

Birkat HaChodesh The Hebrew The Transliteration Yihi ratzon milefanekha, HaShem Eloheinu veilohei avoteinu, shetechadesh aleinu et ha-chodesh hazeh le-tovah ve-livrakhah.  Vetiten lanu chayim arukhim chayim shel shalom, chayim shel tovah, chayim shel berakhah, chayim shel parnasah, chayim shel chillutz atzamot, chayim sheyeish bahem yirat shamayim veyirat cheit, chayim she’ein bahem…

Continue reading

Parsha Thought – Vayakhel

This weeks Torah portion begins with Moshe calling the entire congregation of Israel together. This is where the title is derived from, “And he assembled”. We begin reading about Shabbat being set aside and then donations of the people for the building of the Mishkan (The Tabernacle). Note that it makes clear that the donations were from those who’s heart moved them, indicating a voluntary donation.

Continue reading