Parsha Thought – Shoftim

“When you besiege a city for a long time by fighting against it to take it, you do not destroy its trees by wielding an axe against them. If you do eat of them, do not cut them down. For is the tree of the field a man to be besieged by you? Only the trees which you know are not trees for food you do destroy and cut down, to build siege-works against the city that is fighting against you, until it falls.”

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Parsha Thought – Eikev

Let’s stop and examine the opening words of this week’s Parsha. “It shall come to pass when…” V’haya eikev. Another way to translate that would be to say, “It will come into existence as a result of.” Based on the sentence structure so far we can expect that what is about to follow would be a conditional clause, like an if/then situation. But does that fit with our perception of who HaShem is?

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Parsha Thought – Va’etchanan

At the time Moses was pleading (va’etchanan means “and I sought favor”) with Elohim for another chance to enter into the land, the world wasn’t much different than it is today. You probably assume that that I have a punch line following that statement, but I don’t. Let’s examine this week’s parsha together.

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Parsha Thought – Pinchas

When is enough actually enough for us? How many times do we see injustice occurring and think to ourselves, “I wish someone would do something about that”? We begin this week by reading about Elohim’s reaction to the zeal that Pinchas displayed in the previous Parsha. Let’s to go back to the end of last week’s Torah portion to refresh our memory.

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Parsha Thought – Bechukotai

Why do these blessings only speak of a plentiful harvest and safety from enemies? Are there no spiritual blessings that accompany obedience to the will of Elohim? Wouldn’t “following His decrees and observing His commandments and performing them” (Leviticus 26:3) merit a personal growth and blessing as well? The Torah, apparently, doesn’t see the need to expound on that. It seems to imply that there is a direct link between how the crops turn out and how we behave.  Why?

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